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20130124
20130201
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
from unstable environments, there are consequences. extremism takes root, our interests suffer, our security at home is threatened. >> i thought that was such -- that's hillary clinton testifying this week and i thought that line was so important because it kind of disstills down i think the operational theory in intervention here or american leadership, which is when america is absent, especially from unstable environments, there are consequences. extremism takes root, our interests suffer, security at home is threatened. horace, that seems like a proposition you don't agree with and libya was a failed implementation of that view. >> first of all, hillary clinton has a very short memory, so the kind of leadership she's talking about, we have to be very clear, what kind of leadership we want in africa. the people in africa want peace. they want unity and they want reconstruction. they do not want wars. and what happened in libya is a sign of the kind of militarism we've seen all over africa from the u.s. africa command. 50,000 libyans have been killed out of this intervention. the w
to a changing political environment." >> first of all, on that comment, it is deeply offensive. democrats did the same thing in 2008. i believe andrew cuomo may have said the same thing in 2008, and he was -- >> got a pass. >> yeah. he was not hammered as much. >> he got hammered for that? i read that someone got a pass for it. >> some have gotten a pass. anyway, i think cuomo got hammered pretty hard. but this is -- i saw, richard haass, mr. i'm not going to speculate on anything that's not in front of my nose, you know, this is important. this is an important story because the guy who has been the de facto leader of the republican party over the past four years since george w. bush left town is roger els. he's run the party, he's run the conservative movement. when roger els decides she's not worth the trouble, then that means that conservatism's moving in a new direction. i talked about what happened this weekend at "the national review" institute's talk. i was really surprised. really surprised by what i heard. and heartened, whether it was bill kristol or john hatoritz. also scott walker
visible moments of hillary clinton's senate career when she was the leader of the environment and pickup works committee. and what you saw her do on the witness stand today she did as a senator in the committee. she had drilled down into such detail, into issues that you and i and most of the viewers tonight would not be interested in. and so she exhibited something today that is just part of her dna, and her ability to really know thoroughly something so that people like ron johnson and rand paul and hers who tried to throw her off her game. they looked embarrassing. this is not only somebody who is one of the most popular politicians in the country, but somebody who for obvious reasons had drilled down so deeply into this issue that they were the ones that began to look immature, versus a very profound, capable, person that hillary clinton displayed. >> steve, i am so glad you mentioned public works, because that is a lot of what people consider very boring stuff. i used to be the chief of staff of that committee, and i can attest to a certain amount of bore hearings. barbara boxers, o
be a better candidate for them in this environment that they expect to be running in in 2014. you don't want to be an incumbent. you don't want to be entrenched washington. you want to have a little more leeway to run against washington. >> coming out from the outside it actually provides what you're saying. it gives them that balance. i think what the biggest problem right now in washington is that you have all these senators, these lions that basically remember how washington used to work. nonpartisan -- in a bipartisanship manner. they're getting tired. what message does that say for the next generation of leadership? >> perry, it's interesting. they're free votes now. tom harkin running for re-election, where would he have been on guns? saxby chambliss, where's he going to be? >> he might be someone who plays a big role in somebody who compromises on the debt, deficit. that's what he wants to do anyway. he can now behave as he wants to behave. >> how important, pete, is it that these guys announce early these decisions? >> it's huge. especially for primaries to try and hopefully clear th
asked was it was inspiring to a lot of people. i asked if he felt like four years later the environment in washington seems more nasty than ever had he been able to usher that in, and one of the two reasons that he felt like it had been a challenge was of the media. i think the larger point that he was trying to make was that the media is becoming increasingly skewed over the past few years. we toned listen to the people we agree with, rather than the people that we disagree with, which makes it more difficult to find common ground in a place like washington. >> he did say it's one of the practices by his guest, but that doesn't mean that we need assault weapons is basically his point, i guess. >> yeah. well, i mean, frank, the editor of the new republic asked him point blairnk have you ever fired a gun, and he said, yeah, we go skeet shooting all the time up at camp david. he and his guests, which was news to us and news to a lot of people. i think he did seem very intent on trying to bridge the divide between gun owners and those that don't. it was a telling sign that he says he is a
environment is the passion for some action is higher than the passion to oppose gun measures. that's a first. and politicians have always been afraid of the one issue voter on the gun rights side and not afraid of the passion of the gun restriction side. >> do you agree with what we were just talking about earlier and joanne made this point that if social media has changed the game in many ways. these hearings maybe a lot of political theater. but if an emotional sound bite comes out from gabby gifford or whatever it is that sort of rises to the level that it goes viral or makes all of the headlines or newscast, that it can make a difference? >> i don't think there's any question about it. social media has revolutionized political communication -- >> let me interrupt you for just a second. i don't know if you have a monitor. there is your former colleague gabby giffords who looks fantastic and such an inspiration to so many people coming in now with her husband, mark kelly. continue, congressman. >> i forgot where we were. >> we were talking about whether or not hearings can make a differenc
are not the people with political power. but if you have an environment in which business is hesitant to relocate headquarters in the city because of these issues, then you're going to get people's attention. that's a terrible thing to say, but that is simply the political reality. >> christie hefner, thank you so much. it's great to see you. >> always great to be here. >> reverend al, thank you as well. >> thank you. >>> still ahead, bill gates will be here on set. and coming up next, former vice president al gore joins us here in the studio. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. all stations come over to mission a for a final go. this is for real this time. step seven point two one two. verify and lock. command is locked. five seconds. three, two, one. standing by for capture. the most innovative software on the planet... dragon is captured. is connecting today's leading companies to places beyond it. siemens. answers. i obsessed about my weight my whole life. and then, weight watchers. i amazed myself. get used to it. introducing the new weight watchers 360 program. join for free
're actually o-- things could be worse, in the environment in the united states. and that always ends with the punch line, and sure enough things got worse, here we are. >> but to explain, and for purposes we ran a experiment, an some countries didn't. >> and up to that point, the track of recovery had been about the same in the u.s. and britain. since then, we've started to recover, and they are in a recession. >> thank you for joining us. >> all right, we'll be right back with a rachel maddow show, bullpucky alert, this proves to be a real life pile of bull. hold on. blac girl: ok. dad: you look so pretty. ♪ i'm overprotective. that's why i got a subaru. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. [ female announcer ] some people like to pretend a flood could never happen to them. and that their homeowners insurance protects them. [ thunder crashes ] it doesn't. stop pretending. only flood insurance covers floods. ♪ visit floodsmart.gov/pretend to learn your risk. every signature is unique, and every fingerprint unrepeatable. at sleep number, we recognize the incredible diversity
-style austerity and have bad money the way they did. we're actually -- things could be worse, in the environment in the united states. and that always ends with the punch line, and sure enough things got worse, here we are. >> but to explain, and for purposes we ran a experiment, an some countries didn't. >> and up to that point, the track of recovery had been about the same in the u.s. and britain. since then, we've started to recover, and they are in a recession. >> thank you for joining us. >> all right, we'll be right back with a rachel maddow show, bullpucky alert, this proves to be a real life pile of bull. hold on. is bigger than we think ... sometimelike the flu.fer from with aches, fever and chills- the flu's a really big deal. so why treat it like it's a little cold? there's something that works differently than over-the-counter remedies. prescription tamiflu attacks the flu virus at its source. so don't wait. call your doctor right away. tamiflu is prescription medicine for treating the flu in adults and children one year and older whose flu symptoms started within the last two days.
an environment in which they succeed. this is something that only the president and congress can do. states can't do it. in our country, you have to become an american to become a citizen. we have to have a system of legal immigration. >> let's go to guns. the one bill that seems to have -- there's two bills that have some bipartisan support. one has to do with gun tracking that your colleague republican mark kirk has signed on to with new york democrat kristin gillibrand. the other has to do with universal background checks. can you envision a way of supporting the universal background checks bill? >> chuck, i'm going to wait and see on all of these bills. i think video games is a bigger problem than guns because video games affect people. but the first amendment limits what we can doing about video games. the second amendment to the constitution limits wa we can do about guns. so the details matter to me. i'm going to be skeptical of any of these proposals and examine them in light of the second amendment to the constitution. >> so reading between the lines, you're more inclined to be support
, to that helps to set the environment, i think, but there's still a lot of work to do. the president admits that as we get closer to a resolution or an actual law, that it's going to be tougher. there will be a lot of sack feeses made there. we still need the public to be engaged, and that's why he went out directly to las vegas where the support was overwhelming for him, for many progressives who were thinking about immigration reform, and i think it was a good way of telling the latino community and all the other immigrant groups that right now are faced with problems and immigration because it's a broken system, that, hey, we're going to get this done. we're going to get it done if n a timely fashion. >> we see marco rubio joining these senators, but others have -- ted cruz, rush limbaugh and others have taken strong positions against the proposals. how long is the president going to give the senate and the house to try to work this out before he will come forth with his own proposals? sfwli think he said he is looking anywhere from maybe four to five months and he has to work its way th
of this little country of israel to exist in such a hostile environment. as well as all of the problems that senator hagel has with regard, really, to the global leadership of the united states. i think it's -- he could not have picked a more troublesome, out of the mainstream nominee and i'm not alone. "the washington post" in an editorial early this year begged the president not to choose senator hagel as being totally out of the mainstream. >> senator wicker, thank you for your time. i greatly appreciate it. >> thank you. >>> let's bring in nia-malika henderson, jim rootenberg and jack jacobs. jim, i would like to start off with you. you were on yesterday and discussing an article you'd written discussing who's behind the television ads and radio ads who have gone after chuck hagel on israel, on his comments that were seen as anti-gay. the list goes on and on here but we know it's coming from secret donors. this factor in to the questions that we heard today from the senators? >> i don't -- you know, i have to say to me this is the real stuff and these are obviously lawmakers putting
part of my state are still not living in a security environment. we owe them that. at the same time, i think more and more americans are agreeing these 11 million people need to come out of the shadows and we need to give them a path to citizenship but not favoritism. >> senator mccain, you're exactly right. the polls are showing the majority of americans do support the type of proposal you and chuck schumer are putting forward. what would you say to conservative house republicans that will call anything you try to pat in t-- pass in the senat amnesty. >> i think we will and already are reaching across to our friendson the otherside talking and i think they realize the realities of the 21st century and there will be some difficulties and it's long hard path. i'm confident we will succeed. >> senator shuman, willie geist in new york, good to see you this morning. there's a piece in the "new york times" where a reporter goes to a diner in south carolina. the concern down there is people are being rewarded for illegal behavior, a, and b, being given priority over workers in america who ca
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)